When Technology Bites! – Glass half full or half empty?

  • slider image
  • slider image

When Technology Bites! – Glass half full or half empty?

When a client enquires about the use of a new technology on their bespoke build exhibition stand to set them apart from their competitors and promote a new service or product, the gauntlet falls to us in the industry to research and present the latest developments in mobile technology that serve their needs. One great success story moving forward will undoubtedly be the continued rise in augmented reality devices to promote, delight, and inform the delegate in all manor of interesting & creative mediums.

The beauty of a cleverly crafted augmented reality offering lies in part, in its inherent integration with heavily established, socially and economically viable mobile devices. Tablets, smartphones & touchscreens coupled with some cleaver programming, are used to create a communal experience that promotes a product or service without leaving the consumer, or those around them feeling short changed. But why does this matter you might ask?

Society will not welcome all ground breaking and arguably useful technology with open arms – just ask the developers of Google Glass.

April 2013 marked the role-out of the headset – still in beta form – to the lucky few in the US, and made instant celebrities of their owners. Heavily reported – they became the object of many a selfie, inquisitive question and public interest in the gadget, but their fortunes soon faded. Critics argue that the flashy gizmo is both pretentious and intrusive, letting wearers take photos and record video footage with a simple wink of the eye. Some ‘critics’ have reportedly been recorded chasing Google Glass wearers (or the newly coined ‘glass-holes’ – er-hum), down city streets demanding that their privacy had been salaciously invaded.

These concerns made a swathe of hotels and restaurants ban the wearing of the devices inside their premises – and all this before the product is even officially released on general sale! On January 15, 2015, Google announced that it would stop producing the Google Glass prototype but remained committed to the development of the product. While the proliferation of augmented reality devices is still on the rise, there is still a little way to go on this one before we expect a Google glass feature exhibit on an exhibition stand near you.

Related Posts